Skip to content

The Cookstr Weekly: What To Do With Thanksgiving Leftovers

December 3, 2015
Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Cookstr! We’re so thankful to have you, our readers and members, to share recipes with every week. Whatever you’ve planned for the holiday, we hope it’s delicious.
Once the last bite of pie is savored and the last sip of coffee swallowed, I’m eager every year to turn to the leftovers from the Thanksgiving meal, transforming them with a little creativity and culinary alchemy into breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for the week to come.
While it’s hard to overstate the appeal of a good cold leftovers sandwich and a turkey stock from scratch, go beyond your go-tos this year with congee, chowder and more. Oh, and toss an extra pie slice in the blender with some ice cream for a seasonal milkshake, best enjoyed the next day while watching movies under a warm blanket. Happy post-Thanksgiving.
Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director

 

by James Peterson

“Since the soup contains only rice and water, its real function is as a soothing backdrop for sometimes fiery condiments. I use congee as a medium for slices or strips of leftover roast meats, thinly sliced raw meats, and leftover or fresh vegetables.”

 

The Cookstr Weekly: Healthier Starters & Sides for Thanksgiving

December 3, 2015
Many of us are quite unwilling to accept any changes to our beloved Thanksgiving dishes.  It might be that you find it inconceivable to imagine your Thanksgiving dinner unless there are fried onions atop the green bean casserole – or sausage and chestnuts in the sourdough stuffing. But there are other places in the meal that might be ripe for a bit of culinary innovation, or at least an opportunity to get some vegetables on the plate without much done to them involving butter.
 
A colorful fall salad full of seasonal produce or a whole-grain-studded side dish may fit the bill, and even become one of your new favorite traditions – as either a replacement for or just in addition to those creamy, garlicky, buttery mashed potatoes (never parsnips, thank you, nor cauliflower), which happen to be my unbudgingly favorite part of the Thanksgiving spread.
 Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director

 

by Douglas McNish

 

 

This version of the classic American salad replaces iceberg lettuce with heart-healthy kale and the mayonnaise with a delicious oil-free blended dressing. The key is to cut the kale very finely to allow it to soften properly.

The Cookstr Weekly: Thanksgiving Desserts

November 13, 2015
 

When planning my Thanksgiving menu, I always begin with dessert. Those desserts, in fact, often become the most memorable parts of meals past: I still recall a pumpkin cheesecake, a pie topped with leaf-shaped sugar cookies, the cake that fell apart coming out of the oven only to be reborn as a crowd-pleasing trifle.

Perhaps it’s because I grew up with Thanksgivings that ended predictably with pumpkin and apple pie and vanilla ice cream, but I like to finish the meal on a slightly surprising note. Adding an unexpected twist will just make your guests happier that they saved room for dessert.

Warmest regards,

Kara Rota
Editorial Director
by Beth Allen
In my home state of Texas, pecan orchards are plentiful. The long thin paper-shell pecans make some of the best pies. This pecan filling is flavored with chocolate and has a layer of melted tiny chocolate chips on the bottom.”

The Cookstr Weekly: Simply Nigella

November 13, 2015
Here at Cookstr, we’re huge fans of Nigella Lawson, whether she is putting forth gorgeously impressive holiday meals or whipping up something easy for a weeknight. In her new book Simply Nigella, out now from our sister company Flatiron Books, she taps into the rhythms of our cooking lives with recipes that are uncomplicated and relaxed yet always satisfying. From quick and calm weeknight dinners to stress-free ideas when feeding a crowd to the instant joy of bowlfood for cozy nights on the sofa, here is food guaranteed to make everyone feel good.
 
Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
I positively will everyone in the house not to eat the bananas so that they overripen and I have an excuse to make this. I love all the variants of banana bread I have ever made – much more than I do bananas – but this one is on another level. The smoky bitterness that emanates from both the cardamom and cacao nibs offers a subtle foil to the natural and rich sweetness of the bananas. As this is for breakfast, it isn’t terribly sweet, so feel free to up the sugar to 2 1/4 cups if you have a sweet tooth and want to indulge it. It is also excellent (and tastes sweeter) when toasted and spread with unsalted butter.”

Read more…

The Cookstr Weekly: Ten Twists on Chili for Fall

November 13, 2015
 

Chili is a go-to this time of year, hearty and warming for rainy, snowy, and windy days alike. And because it’s so convenient to make a big batch and eat it for lunches and dinners, I love chili for these weeks when I’m getting used to having less daylight and the nights feel too short for cooking projects.

There might be as many types of chili as there are chili-makers, and debates over authenticity abound. Whether you like beef or chicken, beans or no beans, or even spaghetti (we’re looking at you, Cincinnati), we’ve got chili to keep you cozy this season.

 Warmest regards,

Kara Rota

Editorial Director
by the Moosewood Collective
February is frigid in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. To counter the cold weather blues and blahs, Ithaca holds a Chili Fest. Local restaurants, caterers, and carry-outs showcase their favorite chilis, and happy consumers taste their way through the numerous chili stalls, imbibe local microbrews, and try to stay astride the mechanical bull. Sated, the people then vote for the “best” chili in a set of categories. We don’t mind mentioning that Moosewood has won first place three times in the vegetarian category.”

Read more…

The Cookstr Weekly: Halloween Treats (and Tricks)

October 30, 2015

Halloween is one of my favorite holidays, but it’s lacking the sustained and extensive food traditions of other fall festivities – beyond, of course, the boatloads of adorable miniature candy bars. Start your own tradition this year by making a batch of an easy candy recipe (the Crispy Peanut Butter Candy one above is made in a slow cooker) or incorporating seasonal favorites like pumpkin and apple into sweet and savory dishes alike.

And don’t forget the toasted pumpkin seeds – that’s a tradition worth keeping!

 Warmest regards,

Kara Rota

Editorial Director
by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito
“Apologies are in order. We gilded the lily. It was inevitable. We took a sublime brownie-a brownie that is impeccable and delicious in its own right-cut it into bite-size squares, and drenched it in chocolate. For those of you keeping score at home, the base of this brownie is actually a variation of our classic brownie layered with milk chocolate and malt powder (it contrasts beautifully with the dark chocolate shell). Then, we committed the ultimate sacrilege. We went a little cutesy in décor. We blame Halloween. A Baked chocolate-glazed brownie is pure heaven, but a Baked chocolate-glazed brownie with a hand-piped pumpkin on top is heaven on a roller coaster.”

The Cookstr Weekly: The Laws of Cooking

October 30, 2015

Why do some dishes almost always inspire rapturous pleasure, while others are pretty much guaranteed to be disappointing? The answer may lie in flavor theory, a set of laws that govern what makes food combinations tasty. That’s why I’m so excited to share these recipes from Justin Warner’s The Laws of Cooking…and How to Break Them, a new cookbook out this week from our sister company, Flatiron Books. Justin considers classic and beloved combinations like peanut butter and jelly; or coffee, cream, and sugar, to inspire intriguing and inventive recipes you’ll love to try at home.


Warmest regards,

Kara Rota

Editorial Director
Dry-aged meat is one of the best favors you could ever do for yourself. It can be a little hard to find, but a lot of specialty butchers now offer it for sale, frozen, online. Eat this before you die. Dry aging beef is costly business, because the beef has to be kept very cold and dry for days upon days. It also has to be done with the best cuts of meat, because the marbling (fat/meat ratio) has to be high. It tastes better than money. The process removes moisture from the meat, which amps up the beefy favor. Think about the amount of water in a cup of coffee versus an espresso, and you’ll understand what I’m saying.”
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 32 other followers

%d bloggers like this: