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The Cookstr Weekly: Slow Cookers for Easy Dinners

February 23, 2015

The slow cooker’s appeal is well earned as a tool for those who spend most of the day out of the house but still want to end the day with a home-cooked meal. Like a good no-knead bread recipe or a basic fermentation technique, a slow cooker is a secret weapon that allows time and nature to do the hard work for you.

A slow cooker can be an ideal partner in crime when it comes to tackling dishes that seem too time- and work-intensive for every day, such as French onion soup or risotto.  For more tips and tricks to make the most of your slow cooker meals, check out the Clever Cookstr podcast.

Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Judith Finlayson

 

This pale vegetarian chili is both pretty to look at and delicious to eat. Add the cream cheese if you prefer a thicker, cheesier sauce, and the mild green chilies for a flavor boost. Serve with hot crusty bread and a salad of sliced tomatoes in vinaigrette for a great meal.” - Judith Finlayson

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February 19, 2015

When you’re little, Valentine’s Day is all about enforced equality: identical cards and candy turn up on command in identical doily-decorated tissue boxes and cubbies. But in adulthood, this holiday is all about playing favorites- favorite foods, that is. Valentine’s Day happens to be associated with a number of the foods with which I’ve carried on a lifelong affair: steak, cheese, lobster, and of course, chocolate.

Whether you’re cooking something special for two (and smartly avoiding the prix fixe restaurant rush) or whipping up a batch of something chocolatey and possibly heart-shaped for a party this weekend, here are some ideas to get you into the spirit. No doilies required.

Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Lauren Groveman

 

These fantastic sandwich cookies merge a melt-in-your mouth texture with the most classic American flavor combination of all, making them a real family favorite. The flip side, however, is that these sandwich cookies are delicate and won’t transport well. It’s also wise to make a few extra cookies “with holes” since these are the most fragile. For best results, allow the baked cookies to cool for the full amount of time specified and use a very thin metal spatula to remove them to a wire rack. You should know that these cookies are also great on their own, without any filling, and can also be cut into other shapes and sizes.” - Lauren Groveman

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The Cookstr Weekly: Casseroles for Cold Weather

February 13, 2015
February 5, 2015

As some parts of the country enjoy the oh-so-delightful combination of snow, sleet, and freezing rain that we lovingly euphemize as “wintry mix,” I’m thinking about another kind of mixture, one less likely to soak through to your socks. This kind involves layers of proteins, grains, vegetables, and sauces in hefty baking dishes meant to feed a family.

I’m a fan of casseroles, from inspired takes on lasagna to crust-topped meat-and-potatoes cobblers. And there’s something about serving dinner straight out of the pan it was baked in that makes me feel extra appreciative of having taken the time to cook. Start with the ideas below, and let us know what favorite casseroles you’re cooking this season!

Warmest regards,

Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Janet Fletcher and Rosetta Constantino

In this traditional side dish, thinly sliced artichokes and potatoes are layered with well-seasoned breadcrumbs and baked until the vegetables are tender and the breadcrumbs crusty. The vegetables settle into a “cake” that you can slice neatly and serve with lamb, pork, chicken, or practically any meat. Calabrians prepare many vegetables by this method, including tomatoes, mushrooms, and zucchini-alone or in combination. I sometimes treat fennel this way, too, although the fennel, if sliced thinly, does not need to be cooked first.” - Janet Fletcher & Rosetta Constantino

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The Cookstr Weekly: Game Day Eats

February 4, 2015
January 29, 2015

This Sunday marks the annual celebration of a most important American pastime, one that’s passed down from generation to generation, filled with regional loyalty and familial tradition. That pastime, of course, is eating delicious fried things in front of the television. If you’re a football fan, you’re already geared up for this Sunday’s events. But if you’re in it mostly for the potato skins and the commercials, we’ve got some excellent ideas for you.

Making some of your favorite snack foods from scratch, from tots, chips, and fries to wings and dips, is a perfect way to round out the weekend and kick off the game.

Warmest regards,

Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Lara Ferroni

“Traditional tots are made from russet potatoes, but I like to grate in a little bit of sweet potato or yam. Keeping the skins on helps to preserve some of the nutrients, so give your potatoes a good scrub instead of a peel. This recipe, adapted from one by Cooks Country magazine, churns out light, fluffy tots with a crispy crust every time. The corn flour and ground millet flour give the tots a little extra crunch, but it’s OK to substitute whole-wheat flour if you prefer.”

- Lara Ferroni

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The Cookstr Weekly: Dumplings Around the World

January 23, 2015

Dumplings, as a concept, transcend cuisine: scraps of dough that are cooked alone, like gnocchi, or wrapped around a filling, like pierogi or ravioli. They can be made with flour or potatoes, boiled, steamed, fried, or baked. But they are always meant to be eaten in a mouthful or maybe two, whether in broth, dipped in sauce, or simply on their own. Dumplings can pack a lot of flavor and components into a single bite, making them a little bit more fun and exciting than a single-bowl meal.

And dumplings aren’t difficult to make, especially with shortcuts like wonton wrappers available. Experiment with a wide range of fillings, herbs, spices, and global influences. In the depths of winter, dumplings are just the kind of comfort food that brighten up a weeknight.

Warmest regards,

Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Michael Ruhlman

“Chicken with dumplings is one of the most delicious and comforting meals I know, especially on a cold night. It’s also economical and easy, especially if you have excellent stock on hand. Good stock is key, so if you plan ahead and make some easy chicken stock from the carcass of a roast chicken, this is a meal that can be put together in 30 minutes.”

- Michael Ruhlman

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The Cookstr Weekly: Mac & Cheese, Ten Ways

January 22, 2015
January 15, 2015

I loved making macaroni and cheese from the box as a kid. The careful boiling of the water, the measuring of the butter, the addition of the mysterious packet (even in the organic, less-processed versions of the original that predominantly stocked our pantry, the contents were always some version of bright orange). Even now, there’s a comfort in melding together the contents of that box, although when I do, on a day when the refrigerator is empty or there’s a snowstorm or someone’s home sick, I’m likely to add frozen peas, or fresh basil and spinach, and grate the ends of whatever ‘fancy’ cheeses are languishing in the back of the fridge into the mix.

One of the great joys of mac and cheese is its endless aptitude for customization: even purists must answer the questions of whether to add dry mustard, what cheese blend is best for melting and coating the pasta, and what pasta shape is most apt to snuggle the sauce into all its nooks and crannies. For those of us who are not purists, however, the possibilities for experimentation – with proteins, vegetables, herbs, and spices – are nearly infinite. Here are some ideas, below, but let us know your favorites. Even if the answer is the one from the box.

Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by David Burke and Judith Choate

“This is my classic macaroni and cheese with just a bit of a bite from the horseradish to offset the richness. It is, as it has always been, easy to put together. My mom used to do it early in the morning and then throw the casserole in the oven just as we began asking “When’s dinner?” I can still remember the browning cheesy smell that would fill the house.”

- David Burke & Judith Choate

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The Cookstr Weekly: Ten Soups & Stews

January 12, 2015

For some of the country, this was the week that the cold really hit: the combination of blustery wind chill and wintry precipitation that even layers upon layers of clothing can’t quite protect against. In this weather, I turn to a more internal source of warmth. Bowls of steaming curries and piping hot soups are a welcome respite from the cold.

In Korean cuisine, the dish of rice, meat, and vegetables served in a stone bowl too hot to touch is known as dolsot bibimbap. On freezing days, it serves as a luxurious personal space heater seasoned with spicy chili paste and sesame oil. While you might serve the soups and stews below in a more traditional vessel, their warming qualities suit the season. A scarf might not hurt either.

Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

  by Aliza Green

 

“A delicious celebration soup made in different versions throughout the Caribbean islands, Callalou gets its name from the greens used in it, such as taro, amaranth, or other island-specific greens. However, a mild tasting cooking green such as spinach, Swiss chard, or Chinese spinach make a good substitute. The soup also contains coconut milk and crabmeat, which are typical of Caribbean cooking. Another ingredient, okra (of African origin), can often be found at farmers’ markets. Fresh, young okra is pleasingly chewy and quite delicious. Frozen sliced okra can be substituted but tends to be slippery and should be added during the last minutes of cooking. For those who don’t want to eat pork, substitute diced smoked turkey leg or thigh for the bacon and cook the vegetables in vegetable oil.” - Aliza Green

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